Episode 131: The New Caste System

In a world were computer algorithms decide what is best for us, two groups of people will exist: those who program the algorithms and those who do what the algorithms tell them to do.
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Episode 97: The App Tracking Transparency Smoke Screen

What we've been suspecting all along has now been proven correct: Apple's app anti-tracking feature in iOS does precisely nothing to effectively protect your privacy. In fact, it makes things worse. And Apple probably knew this was the case, too.
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Episode 92: Bugs in Our Pockets

When Whitfield Diffie, Ronald Rivest, Steven M. Bellovin, Peter Neumann, Matt Blaze and Bruce Schneier come together to publish a paper on the security and privacy implications of client-side scanning, we should listen up.
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Episode 90: Blowing the Wrong Whistle

What's more in your interest? Stopping Facebook from leeching off the private data of your life to further its monopoly or forcing it to censor your speech? And now take a guess which of the two politicians want to do and journalists are ecstatic about?
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Episode 84: Steve Gibson’s Squirrel

Authentication on the internet is fundamentally broken. Weak passwords, password reuse, data leaks and untrustworthy third parties tracking us while they log us in are the unfortunate reality right now. One man decided to single-handedly fix this mess.
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Episode 71: Zero Trust, My Ass!

Cloudflare's Zero Trust Browser is a dumb idea if I ever saw one. Here's why. And as a little bonus, we look at the Mighty browser, which is even more insane.
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Episode 67: The Luca Disaster

Here in Germany, we are plunging the country into an Orwellian nightmare which now, for the first time in the history of the country, also includes actual curfews. Meanwhile, the government's next anti-COVID-app is a complete failure on pretty much all levels.
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Episode 66: FLoC of Sheep

Third-party cookies are on the way out and Google says it has found a privacy preserving way of replacing them, using a technology called Federated Learning of Cohorts. Is such a thing even possible? And what are the potential problems we, as web users, are facing here?
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